October 19, 2014
A random Dick Grayson appreciation post.  He’s so adorable as Batman.  

A random Dick Grayson appreciation post.  He’s so adorable as Batman.  

October 16, 2014
"Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I’m one of them."

Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine (via wordsnquotes)

(via literatureismyutopia)

October 16, 2014

sweetlittlesunflower:

If you haven’t heard the Mumford and Sons version of this song, listen now and prepare for tears.

What is this awesomeness?!  

(via ghostrelic)

October 16, 2014

classicpenguin:

Wow. The trailer for Ron Howard’s In the Heart of the Sea surfaced (HA!) today and it’s spectacular. Just to recap: this is a movie based on a National Book Award-winning history (Nathaniel Philbrick’s In the Heart of the Sea); based on gripping first accounts, one of which was only discovered in the 1980s (Chase and Nickerson’s The Loss of the Whaleship Essex, Sunk by a Whale); that inspired one of the greatest novels ever written (Moby-Dick). If that’s not good pedigree, what is?

What what?  I did not know they were making this into a movie.  I’d better hurry up and read the book..

October 15, 2014
tiredtexaseyes:

“VHS” sculpture by David Herbert

The Monolith has appeared again!

tiredtexaseyes:

“VHS” sculpture by David Herbert

The Monolith has appeared again!

(via blue-crow)

October 14, 2014
powells:

Are you ready for the rain?

powells:

Are you ready for the rain?

October 12, 2014

Scaring your cat so much she jumps a foot in the air and backflips, while you laugh so hard you cry and your cat tries to regain her dignity. It’s the little things.  

October 10, 2014

smithsonianlibraries:

Cephalopod Awareness Days always seem to slip away…

Celebrate the most intelligent invertebrates in the world! From October 8 to 12, go gaga for the marine mollusks—squid, octopus, and nautilus. October 10th is Squid & Cuttlefish Day, so we dove into the Biodiversity Heritage Library to bring you these stunning squid specimens, taken from Carl Chun’s The Cephalopoda, an exceptional book from our Invertebrate Zoology collection of the Smithsonian Libraries.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library also has a Cephalopod Awareness Days set on Flickr, so if these don’t float your boat (or over turn them) please check there.

I just want to point out that the name of the first squid is “Vampire Squid of Hell”

October 9, 2014
Oh Snape, why you so hot?  

Oh Snape, why you so hot?  

October 9, 2014
"The bluebird can sing, but the crow’s got the soul."

William Elliott Whitmore

Let’s give it up for the crows. 

October 9, 2014

I don’t know how I feel about the news.  It could be very good, or very bad.

(Source: boogie, via waverlyrowan)

October 9, 2014
"He told me that he had been amazed to find that I, five thousand miles away, had come to conclusions identical with his in every respect." - King Leopold’s Ghost, by Adam Hochschild

"He told me that he had been amazed to find that I, five thousand miles away, had come to conclusions identical with his in every respect." - King Leopold’s Ghost, by Adam Hochschild

(Source: the-kid-with-the-music, via blue-crow)

October 7, 2014
My sister is amazing.  FYI. #shamelesssisterpromotion #windfall #poetry

My sister is amazing. FYI. #shamelesssisterpromotion #windfall #poetry

October 7, 2014

odditiesoflife:

The Origins of Halloween: Appeasing and Honoring the Dead

The fascinating origins of Halloween date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived in an area that is now the United Kingdom over 2,000 years ago, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day represented the end of the summer harvest and the beginning of winter This was a time that was commonly associated with death.

Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the worlds of the living and the dead crossed. On the night of October 31 they celebrated the festival of Samhain. When the ghosts of the dead returned to earth causing mischief and destroying crops, the Celts believed that their presence made it possible for the Druids (Celtic priests) to make predictions about the future. These prophets provided direction and security for surviving the deadly winter that lay ahead. 

Huge sacred bonfires were built where people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to their gods. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes typically consisting of animal heads and skins. This is where the fortune telling occurred. When the festival ended, they re-lit their hearth fires from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during their season of death - the cold and darkness of winter.

By 43 A.D., the Roman Empire had taken over the majority of Celtic land. Over the course of 400 years, two Roman festivals were combined with the Celtic celebration of Samhain. The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans honored their dead. The second festival honored Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is an apple and most likely explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples that is practiced on Halloween to this day.

In 609 AD, Pope Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon in Rome to honor Christian martyrs and the Catholic feast of All Martyrs Day was established in the Western church. Pope Gregory III (731–741 AD) expanded the festival to include all saints as well as martyrs, and moved the day from May 13 to November 1. By the 9th century, the influence of Christianity had spread into Celtic lands where it gradually blended with the older Celtic rituals. In 1000 AD, the church would make November 2 All Souls’ Day - a day to honor the dead.

It is believed that the church was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned, holiday. All Souls Day was celebrated similar to Samhain. Bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels and devils became custom. The All Saints Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before, the traditional night of Samhain in the Celtic religion, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.

sources 12

September 25, 2014

drawgabbydraw:

They are Nature Girl, Lumpy Living Thing, and Dom. You can get them in my shop at drawgabbydraw.goodsie.com.

(via scrappadoir)

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